Thursday, February 4, 2010

Annals of Urban Policy

What would one call the opposite of the Broken Window Theory?

I'm sure Colorado Springs will have found a catchy name in a few months:

This tax-averse city is about to learn what it looks and feels like when budget cuts slash services most Americans consider part of the urban fabric.

More than a third of the streetlights in Colorado Springs will go dark Monday. The police helicopters are for sale on the Internet. The city is dumping firefighting jobs, a vice team, burglary investigators, beat cops — dozens of police and fire positions will go unfilled.

[...]

Neighbors are encouraged to bring their own lawn mowers to local green spaces, because parks workers will mow them only once every two weeks. If that.

Water cutbacks mean most parks will be dead, brown turf by July; the flower and fertilizer budget is zero.

City recreation centers, indoor and outdoor pools, and a handful of museums will close for good March 31 unless they find private funding to stay open. Buses no longer run on evenings and weekends. The city won’t pay for any street paving, relying instead on a regional authority that can meet only about 10 percent of the need.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

我們不是因為快樂而歌唱,而是唱歌使我們快樂 ..................................................

Anonymous said...

Great job!
This city knows where to draw the line in the sand with greedy public sector unions.